HMS018
M. Holterbach & Julia Eckhardt
Do-Undo (in G maze)
CD

Release Date: March 2010

Out of print.

     Do-Undo is a project that emerged out of Q-O2 Werkplaats, a sound-art laboratory of sorts based in Brussels. Julia Eckhardt, one of the artistic directors of this workspace, has been building an archive of recordings, comprised of long-form viola pieces played exclusively in G. This archive, in turn, has been passed on to various musicians, who can use those recordings as they see fit. Enter Manu Holterbach, a French sound-artist, field recordist, and ingenious instrument builder, who had taken part several Q-O2 residencies; and it was there, that he met Eckhardt and was presented with part of the archive of those minimalist viola recordings to use as source material.
      Eckhardt’s recordings seek the rich if occasionally dissonant overtones that have been central to the minimalist works of Tony Conrad, Phill Niblock, Eliane Radigue, and Ellen Fullman. And in his reconstitution of her recordings, Holterbach populates his compositions with field recordings whose turbulent textures and bristling movements sympathetically weave amidst the rasping drones from the viola. On a rather technical level, Holterbach's field recordings on his composition "Two stasis made out of electricity" -- an arc lamp, the sounds of Parisian subways, an electric powerplant -- all naturally buzz with the same G of Eckhardt’s viola, without the benefit of digital pitch shifting. The resulting drones transcend any conceits of conceptualism and strategic intent, instead seeing no difference between the sounds of the environment (man-made or otherwise) and the sounds of the academy. As such, Do-Undo (in G maze) will undoubtably please those with an ear for the aforementioned Phill Niblock as well as the controlled impressionism from Andrew Chalk.
      Limited to 300 copies

Reviews:
The Wire
Tokafi
Scrapyard Forecast
The Sound Projector
Touching Extremes
Le Son Du Grisli


Julia's ecstatic spring phenomenon


Two stasis made out of electricity